Bastien, Betty. (2004). Blackfoot ways of knowing: The worldview of the Siksikaitsitapi. Calgary: University of Calgary Press.
Description: This book is an auto-ethnography of the author. It is an account of her life as a Blackfoot woman and her rediscovery of her culture. This book has an explanation of the Blackfoot grammar and orthography and contains many Blackfoot words.
Read it here

Campbell, Lyle. (1997). American Indian languages: A historical linguistics of Native America. New York: Oxford University Press.
Description: This publication is meant to be a broad assessment of anthropological linguistics (information and history) regarding Native American languages. Read parts of the book here Also available at the University of Lethbridge library.

Eggermont-Molenaar, Mary. (2009). The Uhlenbecks’ life in letters. Canadian Journal of Netherlandic Studies, 29-2.
Description: C.C Uhlenbeck and his wife lived among the Blackfoot in the early 1900’s and learned about the culture. Uhlenbeck was one of the first scholars to publish a full grammar of the Blackfoot language. The Uhlenbeck’s were avid writers and wrote many letters to friends throughout their lifetime. Eggermont-Molenaar analyzes these letters to describe the Uhlenbecks’ life and research.
Read it here

Glenbow Museum. Blackfoot Gallery Committee, & Wigham Family Collection (University of Lethbridge. Faculty of Education. Curriculum Laboratory). (2013). The story of the Blackfoot people: Niitsitapiisinni. Richmond Hill, Ont; Buffalo, NY: Firefly Books.
Description: In partnership with the Glenbow Museum, Blackfoot elders and spiritual leaders agreed to transcribe their stories and traditional ways of life so that it can be preserved for the future generations. There is a glossary of Blackfoot terms at the end of the book. Available at the University of Lethbridge library (Curriculum lab).

Grinnell, George B. (1892). Early Blackfoot History. American Anthropologist, 5(2), 153–164.
Description: This article is an early historical account of the Blackfoot people. There are some early Blackfoot words in the article (many relating to the names for themselves and other Indian nations).
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Heavy Head, Ryan. (2005). Feeding sublimity: Embodiment in Blackfoot experience. Lethbridge, AB: University of Lethbridge, Faculty of Arts and Science, 2005.
Description: This in an auto-ethnography by the author regarding his experience with Blackfoot culture and ceremony. This article has many Blackfoot terms in it (many to do with ceremony).
Read it here

Heavy Shields Russel, Lena, & Inge Genee. (2014). Akaitsinikssiistsi: Blackfoot stories of old. Regina: University of Regina Press.
Description: This book is a collection of traditional oral stories of the Blackfoot that were collected over the years in a collaborative effort by the authors. They were then translated into English. Furthermore, the introduction contains a summary of Blackfoot grammar.

Hovens, Pieter. (2009). CC Uhlenbeck: Collecting and sharing Blackfoot culture and history. Canadian Journal of Netherlandic Studies, 29-2.
Description: The author analyzes C.C. Uhlenbeck’s research work among the Blackfeet in Montana. Hovens looks specifically at the twelve Blackfoot artifacts that were donated to the National Museum of Ethnology in 1935 by the Uhlenbecks. They received these items from the Blackfoot people during their stay among them.
Read it here

Johnston, Alex, & Lethbridge Historical Society. (1987). Plants and the Blackfoot. Lethbridge, AB: Lethbridge Historical Society, Historical Society of Alberta.
Description: This book contains plants that were used traditionally (and still used today) by the Blackfoot people. Some of the information included in each description is the scientific name of the plant, its subdivision, the pronunciation in Blackfoot and a description of the plant’s purpose and use. Available at the University of Lethbridge library.

Little Bear, Leroy, & Ryan Heavy Head. (2004). A conceptual anatomy of the Blackfoot word. Revision, 26(3), 31-38.
Description: The Blackfoot ideology differs greatly from that of English. The way that the world is seen through a language varies across cultures. The authors demonstrate that in order to understand the Blackfoot language and the meanings, you must have a better understanding of the world they are encompassed in.
Read it here: U of L access only

L’Heureux, Jean. (2011). Three-Persons and the Chokitapix: John L‘Heureux’s Blackfoot geography of 1871. Allen Ronaghan (Ed. & Trans.). Red Deer, AB: CAHS Press. (Original work published in 1871).
Description: This book was originally a manuscript written by the author in 1871 when he lived among the Blackfoot as a Catholic priest. The manuscript was written in French and was a description of the land, the Blackfoot culture, and people. It was translated to English in 2011 by Allen Ronaghan. This resource has a small thematic dictionary at the back of the book. 

McClintock, W. (1992). The Old North Trail: Life, legends & religion of the Blackfeet Indians. Nebraska: University of Nebraska press. (Original work published in 1910).
Description: This book was first published in 1910. McClintock was sent into Blackfoot territory in 1896. He went with other forest surveyors and he was the photographer of the expedition. After the men had completed their missions, they left back south and McClintock stayed behind with a Blackfoot guide. Together they joined a camp of Blackfoot where McClintock met many of the leaders and was adopted by Chief Mad Wolf. He spent his time in Blackfoot country learning about their culture. This resource is filled with an abundance of information. Also, it contains many Blackfoot words and an appendix in the back of the book regarding traditional plants of the Blackfoot. Available at the University of Lethbridge library.

Taylor, Allan R. (1989). Two decades of ethnobotany in the northwest plains. International Journal of American Linguistics, 55(3), 359–381.
Description: This essay discusses the natural environment and plants that were traditionally used by the Blackfoot people. The names of the plants in this article are written in Blackfoot as well as identified by their species (in English). Taylor uses this information to analyze how the Blackfoot language is structured in regards to the natural environment.
Read it here

Uhlenbeck, C. C. (1912). A new series of Blackfoot texts from the southern Peigans Blackfoot reservation, Teton county, Montana: With the help of Joseph Tatsey, collected and pub. with an English translation. Amsterdam: J. Müller.
Description: This book is a collection of stories that were accumulated by Uhlenbeck during his stay among the Blackfoot in Montana in 1911. Available at the University of Lethbridge library.

Uhlenbeck-Melchior, Wilhelmina M., C.C Uhlenbeck, & Mary Eggermont-Molenaar. (2005). Montana 1911: A professor and his wife among the Blackfeet : Wilhelmina Maria Uhlenbeck-Melchior’s diary and C.C. Uhlenbeck’s original Blackfoot texts and a new series of Blackfoot texts. Calgary: University of Calgary Press.
Description: This book is centered around the diaries of W.M. Uhlenbeck. She accompanied her husband C.C Uhlenbeck, whom was an anthropologist and linguist, to Montana where he was carrying out his research work. She and her husband lived in Montana among the Blackfeet in 1911. The author analyzes the diaries which contain significant information about Blackfoot culture. Available as an e-book on the University of Lethbridge library website.

Van Tighem, Leonard, Paul Callens, Mary Eggermont-Molenaar, & Victor Van Tighem. (2007). Missionaries among miners, migrants & Blackfoot: The van Tighem brothers’ diaries, Alberta, 1875-1917. Calgary: University of Calgary Press.
Description: The Van Tighem brothers were Belgian Catholic missionaries who resided in the Lethbridge area from 1874 to 1917. They served on many perishes throughout the area with one brother serving on both the Blood and Peigan reserves. They wrote many diaries regarding their life while residing in the area. These diaries contain valuable information about the Blackfoot. The editors of this book transcribe and analyze the original diaries. Available as an e-book on the University of Lethbridge library website. Also available at the U of L library.

Zaharia, Flora, & Leo Fox. (1995). Kitomahkitapiiminnooniksi: Stories from our elders (volumes 1-3). Edmonton, AB: Donahue House Publishing Inc. (Project sponsored by: Kainaiwa Board of Education).
Description: Over 200 Kainaiwa elders contributed to this book series (so far 4 volumes). The purpose of these books is to preserve the stories, life histories, experiences, and personal philosophies of these elders and the Kainaiwa culture. The elders also transfer their knowledge to the younger generations in hopes that they will keep alive the language, memories, and culture of their people. There are many Blackfoot words used throughout the books and a glossary at the back of each one. Available at the University of Lethbridge library.

Zaharia, Flora, Leo Fox, & Marvin Fox. (2003). Kitomahkitapiiminnooniksi: Stories from our elders (volume 4). Edmonton, AB: Donahue House Publishing Inc.
Description: Over 200 Kainaiwa elders contributed to this book series (so far 4 volumes). The purpose of these books is to preserve the stories, life histories, experiences, and personal philosophies of these elders and the Kainaiwa culture. The elders also transfer their knowledge to the younger generations in hopes that they will keep alive the language, memories, and culture of their people. There are many Blackfoot words used throughout the books and a glossary at the back of each one. Available at the University of Lethbridge library.

Zuyderhoudt, Lea. (2004). Accounts of the past as part of the present: The value of divergent interpretations of Blackfoot history. In The Challenges of Native American Studies: Essays in Celebration of the Twenty-Fifth American Indian Workshop, 161-83.
Description: Instead of identifying what is authentic and what is fabricated in history, the author uses divergent accounts from both the Blackfoot and non-Indigenous people to recreate one account of the past. This paper mostly focuses on the interaction that ensued between the Blackfoot and non-Indigenous people. This article has great historical information and contains some Blackfoot words.
Read it here Note: Some pages are omitted in this preview.

(This page prepared by Janine Jackson, June 21, 2016)

(Updated by Mahaliah Peddle, June 15, 2017)