Print sources

Fox, Leo. (1979). A Blood Indian Blackfoot language handbook. Ninastako Centre. Available at the University of Lethbridge library.

Koch, Karsten A., Aistanskiaki Sandra Manyfeathers, Issapoikoan Brent Prairie Chicken, Ainnootaa Wes Crazy Bull, & Alice Post. (2013). Naa aanatsski aonim opaitapiiyssin: A Blackfoot children’s book. Description: Through their paper, the authors describe how their work on a children’s Blackfoot language book can assist in language acquisition. This article has samples of what the online book will look like when it is complete. Read it here

Prairie Rain Publishing in consultation with the Aiitsi’poyiiksi Committee. (2014). Blackfoot words for vegetables. Lethbridge: Prairie Rain Publishing.
Description: The purpose of this book is to educate non-fluent speakers such as children how to say phrases in Blackfoot regarding vegetables. It contains many illustrations. Other contributors: Kainai Board of Education, the First Nation Student Success Program, the Kainai Head Start Program, and Leo Fox (Blackfoot language consultant).

Russell, Lena, & Duval House Publishing. (1996). Blackfoot 10: Niitsi’powahsini. Edmonton, AB: Duval House Publishing.
Description: This resource was created for Blackfoot language instruction at the grade 10 level. Available in the U of L library (Curriculum lab).

Russell, Lena, & Duval House Publishing. (1997). Blackfoot 20: Niitsi’powahsini. Edmonton, AB: Duval House Publishing.
Description: This resource was created for Blackfoot language instruction at the grade 11 level. Available in the U of L library (Curriculum lab).

Russell, Lena, & Duval House Publishing. (1997). Blackfoot 30: Niitsi’powahsini. Edmonton, AB: Duval House Publishing.
Description: This resource was created for Blackfoot language instruction at the grade 12 level. Available in the U of L library (Curriculum lab).

Russell, Lena, Kainaiwa Board of Education, & Duval House Publishing. (2001). Blackfoot 9. Standoff, AB; Edmonton, AB: Duval House.
Description: This resource was created for Blackfoot language instruction at the grade 9 level. Available in the U of L library (Curriculum lab).

Russell, Lena, Kainaiwa Board of Education, & Duval House Publishing. (2002). Blackfoot 8. Standoff, AB; Edmonton, AB: Duval House Publishing.
Description: This resource was created for Blackfoot language instruction at the grade 8 level. Available in the U of L library (Curriculum lab).

Russell, Lena, Kainaiwa Board of Education, & Duval House Publishing. (2003). Blackfoot 7. Standoff, AB; Edmonton, AB: Duval House Publishing.
Description: This resource was created for Blackfoot language instruction at the grade 7 level. Available in the U of L library (Curriculum lab).

 

Online Sources

Title: Blackfoot language lessons YouTube channel
Description: This is a YouTube channel that was created to advocate learning of the Blackfoot language. This channel has hundreds of videos pertaining to the Blackfoot language and instruction. The channel seems to be up to date with new videos.
Website: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRys–UtfjW9ei1Vx_MaiCw

Title: Learning the Blackfoot language
Description: This is a Facebook community page that was created to encourage learning and the daily use of the language. They seem pretty consistent with updating words daily and also have interesting videos and links to other Blackfoot language learning websites.
Website: https://www.facebook.com/LearningTheBlackfootLanguage/

Title: Native teaching aids
Description: Native Teaching Aids is a company owned and operated by Rebecca Goff and partners. Her work began as a graduate student when she received a grant to work with the Blackfeet Nation to create and animated storybook. From there, her work in the field flourished. She realized that there was a desperate need for language learning tools for Indigenous languages. Therefore, with her partners, she began creating interactive websites for Native communities to promote language learning. She also creates table top games (for language acquisition). Most of her work has focused on the Blackfoot language so far. Her webpage has samples of what these interactive language education websites offer. Also, the public can read the information about the table top games and order them from here.
Website: http://www.nativeteachingaids.com/

Title: Niitsitapiisini: Our way of life (Glenbow Museum)
Description: The Glenbow Museum has a webpage dedicated to educating the public on Blackfoot culture. On this website there is a teacher toolkit with resources to aid the instruction of the culture and language, as well as virtual tours. Furthermore, there is a small glossary of Blackfoot terms within this website.
Website homepage: http://www.glenbow.org/blackfoot/index.htm
Link to language page: http://www.glenbow.org/blackfoot/teacher_toolkit/english/culture/language.htm

Title: Ninastako cultural centre
Description: The Ninastako cultural centre is located on the Blood reserve (Standoff, AB). It was originally a school that was created to advocate the teaching of the Blackfoot language. Their mission statement is a commitment towards “protection, preservation, promotion and strengthening of our First Nations’ cultures, heritages, wellness and language by ensuring necessary resources, support and strategies” (Ninastako Cultural Centre, 2016). They achieve their goals with programs such as storytelling by elders, cultural sessions in the community, and cultural activities and camps. On their website, they have a Learning Resources tab on the dropdown menu. If you click on it you will see another link titled Ninastako Blackfoot Learning Resource Library. This is a page that is dedicated to teaching and learning the Blackfoot language. It is not a free program (costs $10.00), but with the program you receive conversational Blackfoot learning tools, quizzes, and Blackfoot legend downloads for one year.
Website homepage: http://ninastako.ca/
Link to language page: http://ninastako.ca/ninastako-blackfoot-learning-resource-library/resources-for-learners-instructors/

Title: Piikani Paitapiisin (developed by Native Teaching Aids)
Description: This website was developed by Native Teaching Aids (Rebecca Goff) in partnership with the Blackfoot Community College in Montana. The website offers greetings with audio in Blackfoot, a dictionary, and lessons and modules for language acquisition which are well developed and have great graphics. There are also external links to other Blackfoot information and history (such as a tour map).
Website: http://piikanipaitapiisin.com/

Title: Urban society for Aboriginal youth
Description: This is a non-profit organization in Calgary, AB. It was established to promote Aboriginal youth living in urban centers to be successful. One of the programs they offer are small Blackfoot seminars in which you can learn the language. There are two introductory courses that you can partake in by becoming a registered user and it is a free service.
Link to language program: http://www.usay.ca/services

(This page prepared by Janine Jackson, June 21, 2016)

(Updated by Mahaliah Peddle, June 15, 2017)